Urgent Care :: Algae growing on my turtle's shell--normal?

This is not a substitute for qualified and relevant veterinarian care.
Read this before you post a new topic here.

Post Posted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 9:17 pm   Algae growing on my turtle's shell--normal?

My red eared slider, Lucky, is a little over a year old and I recently put him in a new 29 gallon tank. He has started growing algae all over his shell due to the basking light that he sits under. Is this normal? or should I worry? also, does anyone know if it's ok to put a sucker fish with a red eared slider or will they try and attack it? If I don't put a sucker fish, how do I get rid of the algae on his shell? is ok to try and wash it off with water and a rubbing with my fingers? Please help!
Silky9009
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 27, 2005

Post Posted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:11 pm   

Sometimes they get algae on the shell, it's nothing to worry about as long as the shell is healthy. You can use a cloth or soft toothbrush to clean the shell if you wish. Just be warned he may not like it :)

As for a sucker fish, be warned that anything you put in the tank with a turtle could potentially be lunch.. :)
Carol
User avatar
cam722
Retired Mod
 
Posts: 2109
Joined: Jun 2, 2005
Location: Northeast PA

Post Posted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:17 pm   

Many turtles in the wild as well as captive, are found with algae covering their carapace. I do think that if your turtle is growing green algae (instead of purple, red, or brown) that the water quality and filtration is excellent.

27 Turtles. 6 Tortoises.
User avatar
JessicaTS
 
Posts: 773
Joined: Apr 13, 2005
Location: Long Island, NY

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 12:24 am   

Thanks Cam and Jessica! I was really starting to worry that it was going to be something harmful. I will try rubbing it off of him since it covers the beautiful design on his shell, and maybe a big sucker fish will be ok? If anyone has any suggestions on how to slow down the growth of so much algae in the tank lemme know.
Silky9009
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 27, 2005

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:57 am   

I have a Pleco in the tank with my turtle and so far everything has been fine between the two. But you have to be prepared that it could and very well might get hurt or eaten by the turtle if you put one in your tank with your turtle. Since I've had the Pleco (about 3.5 months) I've not had any algae growth.

Just curious, how long is your heat light and UVB light on a day? If they are on too long, it may be attributing to the over-growth of algae in your tank. They should be on a day/night cycle, on about 10-12 hours a day but no more. :)
~~~Sonja~~~
sonyj
 
Posts: 1930
Joined: Jul 3, 2005
Location: Tennessee
Gender: Female

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 12:15 pm   

What's the water temp?

You could also add more oxygen to the water.
"You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." -Antoine de Saint Exupery-
marisa
Retired Mod
 
Posts: 12993
Joined: Apr 21, 2005
Location: CT, USA

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 5:51 pm   

hey sonja, just wondering about how big your pleco was when u put it in the tank with the turtle?
the lights are on a cycle but i keep it on i think longer than 10-12 hrs since the basking light keeps him warm and the weather has cooled down quite a bit. also, the heater i have is for a smaller tank since that's the one he was in earlier. any ideas what heater is best and not too expensive for a 29 gallon?

marisa, my other thermometer stopped working so i'm still in the process of buying a new one, but i think the temp is betw 72-75 degrees. somtimes it gets a little cooler at night b/c the basking light goes off. i do cover the tank with a blanket but i'm not sure if that helps..what do you think?
Silky9009
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 27, 2005

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 6:22 pm   

When I went to buy the pleco, I tried to buy one that was roughly the same in length or longer than Koopa. At that time the pleco was a little longer than Koopa was but now they are both about the same (2 inches).

A heater is extremely important to have even year round because water temp should remain constant 24/7. If it fluctuates, your turtle runs a higher risk of getting sick. Do not rely on your lights to stabilize the water temp. 78 water temp for hatchlings, 75 for older turtles with the basking area around 90 while the lights are on.

Here's a couple of heaters that are recommended: Visitherm Stealth heater and Ebo Jager heater and for wattage figure 5 watts per gallon of water. Knowing the temps of both the water and basking areas at all times will help prevent illness from occuring, so when you buy a new themometer you may want to invest in a couple extra to always have one on hand when needed. :)

Btw, how much water do you have in your 29 gal now?
~~~Sonja~~~
sonyj
 
Posts: 1930
Joined: Jul 3, 2005
Location: Tennessee
Gender: Female

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:51 pm   

it's a little over half full
Silky9009
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 27, 2005

Post Posted: Fri Oct 28, 2005 10:25 pm   

The reason I inquired about the water is that a lower level of water in the tank combined with the lights being on for a while could be the reason for the algae growth. Just brainstorming... :D

Remember as Lucky grows that his home will need to grow with him. The recommended tank size is 10gallons per inch of turtle. So when buying anything for his current home (heater, filter, etc) think about the upgrades you will need to do in the near future as he grows and plan ahead. Buying a heater that will work now and later will save you money down the road. :D
~~~Sonja~~~
sonyj
 
Posts: 1930
Joined: Jul 3, 2005
Location: Tennessee
Gender: Female

Post Posted: Sat Oct 29, 2005 1:39 pm   

Silky9009--heat is lost from the surface of the water, so covering the tank at night does help keep the heat in. I use stock tanks along with one 20-gallon, and the stock tanks are really open/have a lot of surface area for heat to escape from. In the winter/cool weather I always cover the tanks at night with a big cardboard sheet (courtesy of Home Depot) on the 110-gallon and a sheet of prismatic lens material on the smaller tanks, leaving one end open for air. In the morning, on the 20-gallon, you can see the condensation on the inside of the tank. Doing this saves wear and tear on the heater and keeps the ambient air in the tank, as well as the water, warmer.
"You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed." -Antoine de Saint Exupery-
marisa
Retired Mod
 
Posts: 12993
Joined: Apr 21, 2005
Location: CT, USA


Return to Urgent Care

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 0 guests